Loading ...

Micro-credentials for Faculty Professional Development | Academic Newsletter | Seneca College

Home » Spaces » Academic Newsletter » Articles » Micro-credentials for Faculty Professional Development
Academic Newsletter

Leave Space :

Are you sure you want to leave this space?

Join this space:

Join this space?

Edit navigation item

Required The name that will appear in the space navigation.
Required
Required
Required The url can point to an internal or external web page.
 
Login to follow, share, and participate in this space.
Not a member?Join now

Micro-credentials for Faculty Professional Development

 /5
0 (0votes)

by Linda Facchini, the Teaching & Learning Centre

in the December 2018 issue

 

Micro-credentialing is a growing trend in education and employee development whereby organizations award recognition for the achievement of specific skills and competencies. For instance, academic institutions may offer micro-credentials to students for employability skills gained through co-curricular activities. Employers may grant micro-credentials to staff upon completion of a training program or employee development course. Professional organizations may award micro-credentials as demonstration of professional certifications or for specific technical skills.

Micro-credentials are commonly represented by digital badges. A digital badge is more than just a graphic emblem; it is a verifiable, meaningful, and sharable token of achievement. Packaged within the badge are the following important data:

Badges contain important data: -issuer -description -image -alignment -criteria -recipient

Digital badges can be shared across the web via storage and display services known as digital backpacks, social media profiles or personal websites, e-portfolios, and blogs. This allows badge earners to assemble a complete record of educational and professional achievements that can be viewed by prospective employers, college and university admissions departments, colleagues, and clients.

As part of Seneca’s Digital Learning Strategy, the Teaching & Learning Centre is pleased to offer micro-credentials to all Seneca faculty in support of professional development accomplishments

The process of micro-credentials for Faculty PD: -apply -issue -claim -display -shareMicro-credentials can be earned for completion of Teaching & Learning Centre courses, online modules, conferences, and workshops. There are many benefits to micro-credentials for faculty:

  • Provide at a glance a visual record of your professional development activities.
    Document and display your PD record by collecting badges. Each badge image carries the name of the micro-credential, providing viewers of your collection an overview of your strengths and achievements.
  • Create relevant teaching strategies and assets.
    The Teaching & Learning Centre’s micro-credentials are evidence-based and meaningful. To earn a badge, you will need to provide evidence of the application of knowledge and skills to your teaching practice. Working towards a micro-credential, therefore, can help you build relevant artifacts that you can incorporate into your lessons.
  • Boost your Faculty Portfolio.
    All Teaching & Learning Centre digital badges are aligned to Seneca’s Standards of Practice for faculty. Badges can be directly embedded into your Faculty Portfolio pages, providing direct evidence of the various teaching standards and making your Portfolio look great.
  • Advertise your expertise.
    Build your professional network by letting your colleagues, students, and external partners know your skills and expertise. All Teaching & Learning Centre badge earners have free access to store, display, and share their badges on the eCampusOntario Open Badge Passport. Badges can also be posted on your CV and LinkedIn profile.

Earn your own badges!
Browse our current list of micro-credentials. Check back often as we expand our offerings.

To learn more about digital badges, visit Open Badges.

 

 


View the December 2018 issue of the Academic Newsletter.

Comments (no comments yet)